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levels of governments—tests which no governments in this co other have fully met. The most urgent challenge of economic d the creation of more adequate political and social institutions resource commodities and maintaining a natural environment oi
REFERENCES
1.   Fisher, Joseph L., and Neal Potter, "Natural Resource Ade
United States and the World," The Population Dilemn Hauser, ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1969.
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5.   U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, The State of Foot
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8.   United Nations Demographic Yearbook 1967. New York, 1
9.   United Nations Statistical Paper K-3, Compendium of Sc
1967. New York, 1967. Table 4.
10.   United Nations, Statistical Yearbook 1968. New York, 19<
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12.   United Nations, Statistical Yearbook 1967. New York, 19(in the traditions, mores, and perceptions of longer-range social consequences. The structure and emphasis of religious beliefs may even have a bearing on the matter; certainly the sense of aesthetics is relevant. Much of this problem can be summarized by discovering how much awareness a particular group has of the requirements of ecological balance and the consequences of upsetting the balance by permitting an overload of waste residuals to be injected into the system.